BeatLounge Radio Home

MARK FARINA: 3 Hours Mix + Exclusive Interview! (March 07)

mf7Modern day record minstrel, Mark Farina, has thrilled crowds globally, entertaining over 1 million fans per year. Mark Farina’s taste making skills continue to turn the heads of seasoned Dance Music veterans as well as newcomers to the scene.

Listen to Mark Farina’s Mix on Friday, March 07! Check our Schedules for local air times

FARINA-SE

Join_event_on_facebook

 

 

 

 


CLICK HERE TO JUMP TO THE TEXT INTERVIEW

 

01. As one of the most prominent DJs and with a history of more than two decades in the music world, how do you see the current electronic music scene?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

02. Does it weight for you to know that you’re one of the house music legends?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

03. We know that you are traveling in Europe these days, what differences you find between the USA and Europe scenes?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

04. Your series of albums called “Mushroom Jazz” where you compile Acid Jazz beats and DownTempo genres, have several volumes released (vol 7 in mid-2013). The order in which you place each track, does it have some logic in particular or is it a rather intuitive process in your particular case?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

05. When you listen to the Vol 01 for example, do you find imperfections, wanting to change things or have them done in any different way?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

06. What gear do you use in your studio and what is your criteria when it comes to creating a track?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

07. What would you recommend any aspiring or beginner producer, to achieve the best possible sound in their tracks?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

08. The music that you usually play at clubs differs quite a bit from the one you compile for Mushroom, how do you get along with that versatility? could we say that they are your Yin-Yang?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

09. Have you ever played in Latin America?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

10. Have you ever played at some event that you remember above all others?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

11. Is there still a place where you haven’t played yet and that represents for you a pending issue?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

12. A message for our listeners around the Globe please:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Interview by Luis Blanco & Alejandra Iorgulescu
BL Team

Read the Interview:

English

01. As one of the most prominent DJs and with a history of more than two decades in the music world, how do you see the current electronic music scene?

The current electronic music scene is just ever growing, changing, day to day. New sub-genres coming all the time, new people getting involved. It’s pretty booming all over. It’s just the subtleties and the styles and different geographic areas are changing, you know, day to day, week to week. Certain countries, places, cities are into one thing, then into another next, and it’s evergrowing!

02. Does it weight for you to know that you’re one of the house music legends?

Uh, it’s an honor to be considered one of the uh, to be a house music legend. I just remember starting of, you know, I never thought that even house would be around, or thought 25 years, 30 years into the future, so … it’s pretty amazing! You know I always knew house was gonna be around, and never really sure I’d be a part of it, so yeah, it’s quite an honor I’ve been playing around for such a long time in the house music scene, and be looked upon among other artists for my DJ skills and my Dj sort of resume so to speak, and you know it’s not about how many albums I put out necessarily or how many tracks I’m making but to sort to be looked up as you know a house person, and a house DJ’s DJ!

03. We know that you are traveling in Europe these days, what differences you find between the USA and Europe scenes?

Oh, there’s many differences between Europe and the US. To start with a couple things, you know, in the USA, the drinking age is 21, which is sort of a big cutoff line in terms of age and difference, whereas in Europe it’s not a clean 21 and up thing, that most of the clubs are in. Another big difference, a lot of the venues in the United States tend to only stay open until 2AM, whereas in Europe things don’t really kick off till 2AM, so it’s quite a difference there and that’s not even getting into the music varieties, you know, Europe fits in the size of the United States, you know like within an hour flight in Europe you can be in multiple different countries, where in the States you know maybe you can get to Canada at times, or Mexico in an hour and that’s about it. All the cities in America are so large it makes it quite different, and just you know with so many countries in a small area you get a lot of different influences in Europe, from Germany, to England to Belgium, France … there’s a lot of different styles of DJ’s that are at a smaller geographic size of region in whereas in America things, I don’t know, things can be general and yeah, it’s very different.

04. Your series of albums called “Mushroom Jazz” where you compile Acid Jazz beats and DownTempo genres, have several volumes released (vol 7 in mid-2013). The order in which you place each track, does it have some logic in particular or is it a rather intuitive process in your particular case?

Uh, I mean, creating a “Mushroom Jazz” tracklist or any sort of say tracklist that needs to be licensed is, you know, very different than just playing it. Um, that’s sort of a big factor when you’re creating a mix: do those tracks need to be licensed by all the artists or can you just place stuff at will? So you know, making a a “Mushroom Jazz” tracklist, there’s sort of, I’ve been doing it for so long there’s a hidden logic. It’s always harder, for me at least as a DJ, to create a tracklist for a mix that I’m going to do at a later time, as opposed to just playing stuff. My DJ style has always been impromptu, like you pick the song you are going to play next, while the song before it is playing. As opossed to a mixed CD that’s licensed, you have to sort of think ahead in time of what you wnat to do and then, worry about mixing things later, so it’s kind of a very different thing than just sort of playing at a club, or in my studio, you know making just a random mix like a podcast where I don’t have to have full licensing. So, but, you know, doing it for so long, there’s a logic behind it.

05. When you listen to the Vol 01 for example, do you find imperfections, wanting to change things or have them done in any different way?

Um, no. I mean when I listen back on “Mushroom Jazz 01” I don’t really want to change anything. Obviosuly, I would do somehting different today, than I did 15 years ago, but I don’t physicaly want to go back and change things. And you know all the mixes I’ve done have all been in real time mixing, no computer, no late night, or late after the fact adding of bits here and there, so it’s always about a flow that kinda happens spur of the moment, and um, I don’t know, you can always look back even wether it’s “Mushroom Jazz” or you hear an old club recording, sometimes you wish there could be something different like ‘oh! I would have brought this in 4 beats later” or ” I would have played this little bit a miniscule lower in volume” but … you know, you can’t
go back and change things so you don’t really spend too much time dwelling on that, you just sort of think about next time, and what you’re gonna do.

06. What gear do you use in your studio and what is your criteria when it comes to creating a track?

Gear in my studio: I’ve got all kinds of, um…I’m more of an outboard gear person, that’s where I come from. I’m still dabbling and learning how to use all of the sort of computer related software so you know, I got a lot of MPC’s, you know, maybe 5 MPC’s, from 1 thousand to 4 thousand, to things in between. Like a couple emulators, like the EMU-XL7 and MP7 and let’s see … a few Jomox drum machines that I really like their sound … let me think what else I got … I just got a Teenage Engineering OP-1 as my newest little bit of outboard gear that I really like. But yeah, I am a drum machine guy, I like all kinds of different drum macines, I’ve got kinda more than I need of that. So … criteria for creating a track is just, you know, I like to start with a funky hook, catch something, it could be one sample of somebody saying something and then you kinda just build from there, and you know, the track can start, it can start from the vocal, it could be a spoken word, it could be something really simple.

07. What would you recommend any aspiring or beginner producer, to achieve the best possible sound in their tracks?

To aspiring producers, advise I would give is, if you have, you know, if you are not playing at a club regularly, it’s great to make your tracks in the studio and then bring them out to a club that you like and hear them there, and then you can go back and tweak things out accordingly if you didn’t like the way it sound, or you did. But you know, like thinking where you want it heard, and then listening to it at other places like, I like to make a track and then go in my car and listen to it, or put it on a completely different sound system in my house, you know, some different speakers, and listen to it. Yeah, you know, like I said, and also you know of course at the clubs, since you know, at least a lot of the stuff I am making, or you know, like, you want to be other DJ’s to be playing and also you want know how it sounds at a club. And it’s also OK if you make something, you don’t do anything with it, you put it out, it’s just for yourself to sort of experiment with and hear and then you tinker with it, you do a new idea. That’s the great things with electronic music, you can make so many bits and bobs, you don’t have to hire a bunch of musicians. You know and of course, if there’s somebody’s tracks you like, there’s a friend of yours, it’s great to watch other people make music and see how they do it cause there’s so many different ways to make a track, it’s like any input, to watch stuff being done is great.

08. The music that you usually play at clubs differs quite a bit from the one you compile for Mushroom, how do you get along with that versatility? could we say that they are your Yin-Yang?

Yes. The difference between “Mushroom Jazz” and house can be very different. You drop one sometime and another time you won’t drop the other, so … But it also opens up doors, if you are playing just house, 120 to 125bpm’s stuff that’s, you know, you are only limiting your styles,  or what you can play. I like all tempos, and also of course with new disco now, it sort of fills the gap in between, which is “Mushroom Jazz” runs around hip hop being the speed at 100bpm’s and like I said house being 125 and it fills the gap in between that all kinda “newy” disco sound, so … and there’s just different times of the day when sometimes a different tempo than a house speed fits well, like an early morning sunrise thing, you know, you can drop a different tempo or style and it opens up doors to try different stuff, you know … early evening after dinner, and you are playing for a different crowd, or you know, there’s just different situations, and sometimes a 4×4 house set might not be the greatest option available.

09. Have you ever played in Latin America?

Ohh favorite Latin American show! It’s always hard for me to go back and say “what’s your favorite shows?!”, but … I mean, if someone stands out, it would be like, uh … Skol Beats in Brazil. Around, I wanna say… Sao Paulo 19 .. what was that?  maybe around 2000ish? Playing the Edge for the first time in Sao Paulo. Playing in Colombia, Bogota, like I don’t know, like the 30th floor of a sky scrapper type thing, 30th-40th floor, it was great. I’ve had some great shows in Mexico City. Creamfields in Buenos Aires, it was a great, great show.

10. Have you ever played at some event that you remember above all others?

Recent events or old events that stand out, there’s always so many it’s hard over so many years … opening for Kraftwerk at Coachella was amazing and just to be on the same stage as one of my icons and greatest influences, Um … let’s see! like a sunrise set in Maui with the old stompy crew back in the day. Playing Sub Club in Glasgow, or Fabric in London. Um, let’s see … I don’t know, it’s always so hard to pick some of my favorite, favorite ones, of course, going to Smart Bar in Chicago which is the place I played for 25 years, everytime it’s always amazing and I just love being back with my Chicago peeps. And then the old Loft party days when I started, where awesome! when it was Derrick Carter, Gemini Spencer Kincy and myself, playing you know like you know like it just used to be lofts on Milwaukee Avenue and different parts of Chicago that were underground, you just bring a couple kegs of beer and $5 to get in and you go till the police come.

11. Is there still a place where you haven’t played yet and that represents for you a pending issue?

A place I haven’t played which still for some reason I have not made it there after all this time is Germany at all. And you know, being in Germany, I haven’t been to Berlin, so Berlin I’ve been wanting to play. I don’t know why it hasn’t happened. I had a recent offer coming up to maybe do Watergate with the Jesse Rose’s night but unfortunately, being a Daddy I can’t get to Europe every weekend like I might like to so it was a difficult gig to get to, but I’m hoping it won’t be the last opportunity to be playing in Berlin.

12. A message for our listeners around the Globe please:

Um, gee! a message for listeners would be just: thanks for tuning in, I’m always trying to promote new sounds and the main goal I’ve done this whole DJ thing for is to share all these new sounds that I am lucky to get. And now as time has gone by with Djing, you get to share new and old tracks that maybe, you know, some of the old bits that I’ve been fortunate to be around for years that you know, go missed in this new day and age, so it’s a combination of yeah, the newest goodies mixed with the oldest gems and sharing them for all the listeners. so, thanks for listening!

Español

01. Como uno de los DJ’s más destacados y con una trayectoria de más de dos décadas en el mundo de la música, ¿cómo ves la escena electrónica actual?

La escena de música electrónica actual está en constante crecimiento, cambiando, día a día. Nuevos subgéneros aparecen todo el tiempo, nueva gente se involucra en el medio. Está en auge por todas partes. Las sutilezas, los estilos y diferentes áreas geográficas cambian, ya sabes, día a día, semana a semana. Ciertos países, lugares, las ciudades están en una cosa y luego en otra, y se pone cada vez mayor.

02. Pesa para ti saber que eres una de las leyendas del house?

Es un honor ser considerado uno de los … bueno, ser una leyenda de la música house. Recuerdo al comenzar, ya sabes, nunca pensé que la musica house incluso seguiria vigente, o pensaba en 25, 30 años hacia el futuro, así que… es increíble! Sabía siempre que el house seguiria, y nunca realmente imagine que sería una parte de la movida, así que sí, es un gran honor el haber estado tocando por mucho tiempo en la escena house y ser tomado como ejemplo por otros artistas por mis habilidades como DJ y mi currículum de Dj por así decirlo, y sabes, es que no se trata de cuántos álbumes puedas necesariamente tener a la venta o cuantos tracks estoy haciendo, pero ser visto como una persona del house, y un DJ house entre DJ’s!

03. Sabemos que estás de viaje por Europa en éstos días, qué diferencias encuentras entre la escena de USA y la de Europa?

Hay muchas diferencias entre Europa y los Estados Unidos. Para empezar con un par de cosas, ya sabes, en los E.e.u.u., la edad legal para beber es 21, que es una especie de línea de corte grande en cuanto a la edad y la diferencia, mientras que en Europa no es tan estricto, la mayoría de los clubes están OK con eso. Otra gran diferencia, muchos de los lugares de los Estados Unidos tienden a sólo permanecer abiertos hasta las 2AM, mientras que en Europa las cosas realmente no comienzan hasta 2AM, así es que hay una gran diferencia y ni hablar de las variedades de la música, ya sabes, Europa entra en el tamaño de los Estados Unidos, en una hora de vuelo en Europa puedes estar en varios países diferentes, donde en los Estados tal vez puedes llegar a Canadá a veces o México y eso es todo. Todas las ciudades en América son tan grandes, lo cual lo hace muy diferente, y ya sabes con muchos países en un área pequeña tienes un montón de diferentes influencias en Europa, de Alemania, a Inglaterra a Bélgica, Francia… hay un montón de estilos diferentes de DJ que se encuentran en un tamaño más pequeño geográfico, cosa que en EE.UU, no sé, las cosas pueden ser más generales y Sí, en sí muy diferentes.

04. Tu serie de álbumes llamados Mushroom Jazz donde compilas beats de Acid Jazz y géneros más DownTempo, llevan varios volúmenes, (el vol 7 se editó a mediados de 2013) El orden en el que colocas cada track, tiene alguna lógica en especial o es más bien intuitivo en tu caso particular?

Crear el tracklist para “Mushroom Jazz” o cualquier tipo de tracklist que necesitas tener una licencia es, ya sabes, muy diferente que cuando sólo tocas musica. Es un factor importante cuando estás creando una mezcla: esos tracks necesitas una licencia de todos los artistas o puedes colocar cosas a tu antojo? Así que ya sabes, al hacer un tracklist para “Mushroom Jazz”, hay una especie de, si … he estado haciendo esto por mucho tiempo y hay una lógica oculta. Siempre es más difícil, para mí por lo menos como DJ, crear una lista de canciones para una mezcla que yo voy a hacer en un momento posterior, en comparación con sólo tocar. Mi estilo DJ siempre ha sido improvisado, eliges la canción que va a sonar próxima, mientras que la anterior está sonando. A diferencia de un CD que se licencia, debes pensar en el futuro en vez de lo que quieres hacer ahora y luego, te preocupas por mezclar cosas más adelante, así que es una cosa muy grande a solo tocar en un club, o en mi estudio, o hacer un mix al azar como un podcast donde no tengo que tener licencias completas. Pero, hago esto hace tanto tiempo, hay una lógica detrás de todo esto.

05. Cuando por ejemplo escuchas el Vol 01, te encuentras viendo imperfecciones, queriendo cambiar cosas o haberlas hecho diferente?

No. Quiero decir cuando escucho “Mushroom Jazz 01” no quiero cambiar nada. Obviamente, haría algo diferente hoy en día, a lo que hice hace 15 años, pero no quisiera físicamente volver atrás y cambiar las cosas. Y todos los mixes que he hecho han sido en tiempo real de mezcla, ninguna computadora, ninguna noche de desvelo, o ediciones interminables de beats aquí y allá, así que se trata siempre de dejar fluir las cosas un poco de improviso, y, no sé, puedes siempre miras hacia atrás ya sea “Mushroom Jazz” o si escuchas una vieja grabación de club, a veces deseas haber hecho algo diferente como ‘oh! esto habría entrado mejor 4 beats más tarde” o “Hubiera tocado este pedacito minúsculo a menor volumen” pero… sabes, no puedes volver atrás y cambiar las cosas, así que realmente no gasto mucho tiempo pensando en eso, solo piensas en la próxima vez, y lo que vas a hacer.

06. ¿qué equipo usas en tu estudio y cuál es tu criterio cuando se trata de crear una pista?

Equipos en mi estudio: tengo todas clases de, bueno … yo soy una persona más tradicional, que es de donde yo vengo. Todavía estoy incursionando y aprendiendo a utilizar todo tipo de software relacionado así que ya sabes, tengo un montón de MPC, tal vez 5 MPC, de mil a 4 mil, a cosas intermedias. Como unos par de emuladores, como el EMU-XL7 y MP7 y vamos a ver… unos cuantos Jomox drum machines, que realmente me gustan su sonido… déjame pensar qué más tengo… Acabo de comprar un Teenage Engineering OP-1. Pero sí, soy un tipo de máquinas de percusion, me gusta todo tipo de drum machines, tengo más de lo necesito. Así que… criterios para crear un track es sólo, sabes, me gusta empezar con un gancho funky, tomar algo, podría ser un sample de alguien diciendo algo y entonces simplemente construir el track a partir de ahí y ya sabes, puede empezar desde la voz, podría ser una palabra, puede ser algo muy simple.

¿Qué le recomendarías a cualquier productor principiante, para lograr el mejor sonido posible en sus pistas?

A los aspirantes a productores, el consejo que daría es que si no tocan en un club con regularidad, es genial para hacer sus tracks en el estudio y luego llevarlos a un club que les guste y oírlos allí, y entonces pueden volver atrás y modificar en consecuencia las cosas si no les gustó la forma en que suena. Pero ya sabes, pensar donde quieren que sus producciones suenen y luego escucharlas en otros lugares como por ejemplo me gusta hacer tracks y luego oirlos en mi auto, o ponerlos en un sistema de sonido totalmente diferente en mi casa, parlantes diferentes y escucharlo. Sí, como he dicho y también sabes por supuesto en los clubes, quieres que otro DJ los toque y también quieres saber cómo suena en un club. Y también está bien si haces un track, y no haces nada con él, lo guardas, es sólo para ti mismo poder experimentar, escuchar y juguetear con él, hacer una nueva idea. Esa es una de las grandes cosas de la música electrónica, puedes crear pedacitos y no tienes que contratar a un grupo de músicos. Y por supuesto, si hay alguien tiene pistas que te gustan, un amigo tuyo por ejemplo, es genial ver a otros hacer música porque tantas maneras diferentes de crear una pista, es como cualquier aprendizaje, ver como las cosas se hacen es genial.

08. La música que sueles tocar en Discoteques difiere bastante de la que compilas en Mushroom, cómo te llevas con esa versatilidad sonora? podríamos decir que son tu Ying-Yang?

Sí. La diferencia entre “Mushrooom Jazz” y house puede ser muy grande. Alguna vez tocas una cosa y otras algo distinto, así que… Pero también abre otras puertas, si estás tocando solo house, 120 a 125bpm sólo estás limitando tus estilos, o lo que puedes tocar. Me gustan todos los tempos y también por supuesto con el new disco ahora, llena la brecha en el medio, que es “Mushroom Jazz” corre alrededor de la velocidad del hip hop a 100bpm y como dije house siendo 125 y llena la brecha entre los sonidos mas nuevos ‘disco’. Y hay diferentes momentos del día cuando a veces un tempo diferente que una velocidad house encaja bien, como un amanecer temprano, ya sabes, puedes meter un tempo diferente o estilo y abre las puertas a probar cosas diferentes … atardecer después de la cena y estás tocando para un publico diferente, o ya sabes, hay situaciones diferentes, y a veces un mix house 4×4 no es la mejor opción disponible.

09. Tocaste alguna vez en Latinoamérica?

¡Show Latinoamericano favorito! Siempre es difícil para mí volver y decir “Qué show fue tu favorito?”, pero… Es decir, si alguno se destaca, sería como, eh… Skol Beats de Brasil. Alrededor de, quiero decir… Sao Paulo 19… ¿Cuando fue? ¿Tal vez por el 2000? Tocando en the Edge por primera vez en Sao Paulo. Tambien en Colombia, Bogotá, como no sé, en el piso 30 de un rascacielos, piso 30 o 40, fue genial. He tenido algunos grandes espectáculos en la ciudad de México. Creamfields en Buenos Aires, fue un gran, gran show!

10. Tocaste en algún evento que recuerdes por encima de todos los otros?

Eventos recientes o antiguos que se destacan, siempre hay muchos es difícil elegir uno durante muchos años … la apertura de Kraftwerk en Coachella fue increíble y sólo con estar en el mismo escenario que uno de mis iconos y mayores influencias, Em… vamos a ver! un amanecer en Maui con el viejo equipo. Sub Club de Glasgow, o Fabric en Londres. Veamos… No sé, siempre es difícil escoger favoritos, por supuesto, Smart Bar en Chicago que es el lugar donde habia tocado durante 25 años, cada vez es increíble y me encanta estar con mis amigos de Chicago. Y los dias de las fiestas de Loft cuando empecé, eran impresionantes! eramos Derrick Carter, Gemini Spencer Kincy y yo tocando, solían haber lofts en Milwaukee Avenue y diferentes partes de Chicago que eran underground, solo traias unos barriles de cerveza y $5 para entrar y tocabas hasta que caia la policía.

11. Existe aún algún lugar donde no hayas tocado Mark Farina y que sea para ti una cuenta pendiente?

Un lugar donde no he tocado todavía por alguna razón después de todo este tiempo es Alemania. Y ya sabes, estando en Alemania, no he estado en Berlín, entonces Berlín es el lugar que he estado esperando para tocar. No sé por qué no ha ocurrido. Tuve una reciente oferta para participar de las noches Jesse Rose de Watergate pero desafortunadamente, al ser papá no puedo ir a Europa cada fin de semana como me gustaría, así que era una fecha difícil, pero espero no sea la última oportunidad para tocar en Berlín.

12. Un mensaje para nuestros RadioEscuchas alrededor del globo por favor:

Un mensaje para los oyentes: Gracias por sintonizar, estoy siempre tratando de promover nuevos sonidos y es el objetivo principal, por lo cual he hecho todo esto de ser DJ, para compartir todos estos nuevos sonidos que tengo la suerte de conseguir. Y ahora como ha pasado el tiempo, puedo compartir pistas nuevas y viejas que tal vez, tú sabes, algunos de los viejos beats que he sido afortunado de tener cerca mio durante tantos años, que de otra manera podrian verse perdidos hoy en dia, es una combinación de sí, las cosas más recientes mezclada con las gemas más antiguas y compartirlas para todos los oyentes. Gracias por escucharme.

+INFO
Official Website
Facebook Page
Twitter
YouTube
Dope Den Productions
Soundcloud

1 March 2014 BL News

Follow Us